Joanne Arnett, 2016
Andrea Donnelly, 2014
Olivia Valentine, 2012
Sharon Kallis, 2010
Stephen Beal, 2008
Andrea Vander Kooij, 2006
Elana Herzog, 2004
Soonran Youn, 2002
Sonya Clark, 2000
Tomoko Ishida, 1998
Kyoung Ae Cho, 1997
Marcie Miller Gross, 1996
Frances Dorsey, 1995

Soonran Youn: 2002
Lillian Elliott Award Recipient

 

Recent Work - 2016

Breathing Holes (group of 5 heads), 2015
Dimensions vary - approx. 28 1/2" x 12" x 8 1/2"
Stainless steel wire, enamel paint.

Soonran Youn - Breathing Holes (group of 5 heads)
Soonran Youn, Breathing Holes (group of 5 heads), 2015. (Photos by KC Studio)


Soonran Youn - Breathing Holes (detail)

Detail - Breathing Holes.

"Figurative forms constructed in parametric linear structures that contain space within reside in the existential field where the self and the world, body and mind, to be and not to be intersect each other. Punctuated body is a metaphorical outcome of such simultaneity leaving breaks and holes inside. It represents 'to be and not to be' by projecting the imperfection of body fragmented, collapsed, and deconstructed as a part of this irreversible world. The broader the break gets, the higher the probability of self absence is. Being as a hole means living in the fourth dimension. Holes are reproduced by bodily experienced pain under such condition as well as the indeterminate world. A hole can be a base of formation, but its presence evokes the feeling of obscurity. A hole is an imploded crack due to the collision of meaning, truth or value. How could I look into the hole without sinking in? Contemplating on void that is nothing and everything at the same time is a practice for emptying out 'I, here and now', for returning to anonymity, and for becoming considerate. Life is punctuating holes on breathing in such ways."

 

Recent Work - 2014

108 Agony, 2013
The life-size blue figure on the left, constructed of telephone wires and cable ties, appears to observe the row of 108 small figures mounted on the wall. Each small figure is 14" (H).

Soonran Youn - 108 Agony
Soonran Youn, 108 Agony, 2013. (Photos by Myungrae Park)


Soonran Youn - 108 Agony (detail)

Detail - 108 Agony.

Detail - 108 Agony, (above) left to right: 'belief, parenthood, loss, concentration, passion, commitment, illness, domination, stress, happiness, inheritance, neglet, youth, regret, longing, and sympathy'.

States Soonran, "According to Buddhism, there are 108 agonies, which one must undergo throughout three lives: past, present, and next life."

 

Recent Work - 2010

Daydream, 2009
24” x 43” x 11”
Enamel copper wire, polyethylene, acrylic paint.

Soonran Youn - Daydream
Soonran Youn, Daydream, 2009. (Photos by Myungrae Park)


Soonran Youn - Daydream (detail)
Detail - Daydream.

"I adapt crochet to obtain a see-through skin that deals with inside/outside relationships," explains Soonran. "Crocheting wire made this possible and allows a look through the skin giving the impression of the fragility of being. I want it to be a vehicle for viewers to initiate little conversations with themselves, not to be one of my speeches thrown in their faces."

 

Work Submitted for the 2002 Lillian Elliott Award

Island No. 3, 2000
82” x 9 1/2” x 27”
Linen thread.

Soonran Youn - Island No. 3 (detail)
Soonran Youn, Detail - Island No. 3, 2000. (Photos by Wendy McEahern)


Soonran Youn - Island No. 3
Soonran Youn, Island No. 3.



Soonran Youn - Island No. 3 (detail)
Soonran Youn, Detail - Island No. 3.

"This work implies the isolation of bodily individuality, which can never be broached but held in solitude until the end. The figure represents a contradiction between dreams and realities. The head facing upwards yearning for the torso to grow like a tree to touch the sky, the dream world; but the gravity of the reality is pulling the whole body downwards against the longing. Therefore, the figure is distorted and elongated."

 

Soonran Youn (Facebook)